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Top 10 tourist attractions in japan- Best 2018

Top 10 tourist attractions in japan
Best 2018

Text: https://goo.gl/ikQ1bg
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1. Mount Fuji: Without a doubt Japan’s most recognizable landmark, majestic Mount Fuji is also the country’s highest mountain peak, towering 3,776 meters over an otherwise largely flat landscape to the south and east, tall enough to be seen from Tokyo more than 100 kilometers away. Mount Fuji has for centuries been celebrated in art and literature, and is now considered so important an icon that UNESCO recognized its world cultural significance in 2013.

2. Imperial Tokyo: Tokyo’s most famous landmark, the Imperial Palace, with its beautiful 17th-century parks surrounded by walls and moats, is a must-see when visiting the nation’s capital. Don’t be put off by the fact that the majority of the palace is closed to the public (it’s still in use by the Imperial family), as there is still enough to see simply by strolling the grounds.

3. Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park: While little need be said here of the horrors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima in August 1945, much can be said of the incredible efforts this vibrant city has made to commemorate the many victims of the world’s first nuclear attack, and perhaps even more importantly, the symbol of lasting peace Hiroshima has since become.

4. Historic Kyoto: One of Japan’s most visited cities, lovely Kyoto – one of the few cities in the country to be spared the devastation of WWII – attracts more than 10 million visitors annually to explore its fine old streets and architecture, much of it unchanged since the Imperial family took up residence here more than 1,000 years ago.

5. The Island Shrine of Itsukushima: Just a short ferry ride from mainland Hiroshima is the island of Miyajima, famous the world over as Japan’s Shrine Island. Covering an area of 30 square kilometers in Hiroshima Bay, Miyajima is best known as the home of the Itsukushima Shrine, a Shinto temple dedicated to the Princess daughters of the wind god Susanoo. Dating from the eighth century, the majority of the shrine’s buildings rise out of the waters of a small bay supported only by piles. The effect at high tide is simply stunning, making these structures – including the famous Great Floating Gate (O-Torii) – appear as if they’re floating on water.

6. Temple City: Historic Nara: For centuries the hub of Japanese culture, the lovely unspoiled city of Nara is home to a large number of historic buildings, along with important national treasures and works of art. In addition to its many historic streets, the city boasts numerous important old temples, including the magnificent seventh-century Kofuku-ji Temple, and perhaps the best known of the Seven Great Temples of Nara, the splendid eighth-century Todai-ji (Great East Temple), famous for its huge bronze statue of the Great Buddha cast here in AD 749.

7. Osaka Castle: Built in 1586 by famous Japanese warrior and politician Toyotomi Hideyoshi, Osaka Castle (Ōsaka-jō) was at the time the largest and most important fortress in the country. Although destroyed and rebuilt a number of times since, the present structure, built in 1931, remains true to the original.

8. Chubu-Sangaku National Park and the Japanese Alps: Japan boasts a number of outstanding areas of natural beauty, many of them designated as national parks or, in some cases, UNESCO World Heritage Sites. One of the country’s most spectacular parks is Chūbu-Sangaku National Park in the center of Honshu, incorporating in its northern and central regions the group of mountains collectively referred to as the Hida Mountains, or Japanese Alps.

9. The Atsuta Shrine, Nagoya: The Atsuta Shrine, in the heart of the city of Nagoya, is the most important Shinto shrine in Japan attracting more than five million visitors each year. Established in the first century, this religious site is famous for its preserved Imperial insignia, the “grass-mowing sword” (kusanagi-no-tsurugi), one of only three in the country.

10. Fukuoka’s Castle and Ancient Festivals: One of the few surviving examples of the once prolific and majestic hilltop homes preferred by Shoguns and city rulers, Fukuoka Castle (Fukuoka-jō) is one of the highlights of a visit to Fukuoka. Once part of a massive complex that covered an area of some 47,000 square meters, this beautiful castle still impresses with its size and its position on a tall foundation overlooking the Naka River.

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